March 3, 2009

Body like Business?

Posted in Business, Life tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:01 am by lindaslongview

Each of us only gets one body.  From an early age we are trained to care for ourselves — brush & floss our teeth, eat right, exercise regularly, and rest appropriately after illness or injury.  Although most of us do all of these things regularly, it is the last one that can be the most vexing. It is challenging because injury and illness are inherently unplanned, undesirable, and unintended.  Recovering from injury or illness requires expenditures of time and effort to recover that would not be required if everything had “gone to plan.”  So there is opportunity to be bitter and angry.  The reality is that there is risk in sports (one cause of injury) and being around others (one cause of illness transmission). It is the payoff: fun in sports or the creation/nurturing of a social/professional connection, that makes the risk worthwhile.

In an analogy to business, routine care is required for operations  — develop products, purchase raw materials, manufacture products, sell products, account for the flow of money and products, and take time to recover from setbacks.  As in illness or injury, setbacks require expenditures of time and effort that would not be required if everything had “gone to plan.” Similarly, there is risk in business — if it was easy, it would not be a long-term business.  It is the payoff:  money (in a for-profit business), that makes the risk worthwhile.

In both cases (body or business), routine care requires planning, precautions, and prudence.  Yet these cannot prevent all setbacks; they minimize the severity, duration, and frequency.  Thus, in order to be truly successful, we need to take the long view and be disciplined in our recovery from setbacks.  We must expect setbacks, plan to expend time and effort to recover (relative to the risk of the payoff), and not be negative or rushed in our recovery execution.  One way is to buffer projects from uncertainty by realistic planning, disciplined tracking, and adequate resource deployment for recovery using Goldratt’s Critical Chain, all the while staying, persistent, passionate, and positive!

On a personal level, I am working hard to recover an ankle sprain (a moment’s inattention to a pothole in a running trail left my ankle discolored, swollen, and sore).  Since I want to enjoy the wind in my face (from running) for as long as I live (the long view), I am in rehab (toe-raises, gentle stretches, and swimming).  Only nine (9) more days until I can run on my ankle again!  But who is counting?!

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